Travel hacks for Hiking

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No matter the length of the trip—be it a weekend beach getaway or a three-week Himalayan trek—you’ll need to pack a bag, and you’ll want to pack it right.

We have browsed the internet and compiled the most complete list of travel hacks, tips and advice that we could find.While we have compiled this comprehensive list for now, we hope to keep growing it over time and to inspire new hacks, tips and advice to share – if you have one we have not included,please let us know in the comments beneath.

1. Get Great fitting-boots

Boots that fit improperly can make you suffer from unnecessary blisters and lost toenails. Grabbing a pair (or two) of the best-reviewed hiking boots on Amazon that aren’t too tight or way too big for your feet is critical.

2. Walk around your backpack before leaving

If you pack too many items in your backpack, you’ll needlessly suffer from carrying a heavier load that necessary. Test out picking up, toting and putting down your intended load on your back while still at home, before embarking on your journey.

3. Get a buddy if you feel led to do so

There’s safety in numbers. Though we love to read the tales of folks brave enough to venture off on solo hikes, it helps to consider bringing others – especially more experienced hikers – along on your trip.

4. Learn how to safely start a fire

Even if it’s raining, it helps to follow the Boy Scout rules on how to still use collected wood, your handy pocket knife and starter accessories to get a fire going that can keep you warm, give light and cook your food.

5. Learn how to setup your tent before you leave

It can be tempting to let your tent stay nice and tidy, planning to unpack it and read the rules when you’re on your hike. It’s better, however, to learn the intricacies of tent setup – which can be daunting – in the safety of your own backyard first, instead of in the wild.

6. Double check last minute weather reports

Even if the location you’re planning to hike is predicted to be filled with sunny skies and pleasant weather, make sure you’re aware of up-to-the-minute storms or other approaching factors than can adversely affect your hike.

7. Do short hikes first

Before setting out on the monumental hike of a lifetime, plan to complete several smaller hikes first in order to acclimate yourself to the process.

8. Remember the first-Aid kits and bring extra Band-Aids

9. Bring enough water

Even if you anticipate running into drinkable, fresh-water sources along your path, realize that it’s healthy to bring a water bladder full of liquid in order to keep you well hydrated each day.

10. Take  something to read

Although safety is very important, it doesn’t mean you can’t bring fun items along with you. During the downtime and slow hours when you’re not staring at the sunrise, you might want to pull out your favorite book or a compact copy of the New Testament to keep you company.

11. Inform others of your hiking plan

Instead launching off without letting any family members or friends know where you’re going, leave your detailed hiking safety plan with at least one person you can trust – and plan to check in with them at appointed times.

12. Stay calm, keep your wits about you and have fun

Remember the main reasons you have embarked upon the journey. Even if you come across unexpected adventures, don’t give in to fear. Enjoy the exercise and keep calm. Remain visible and send distress signals in case of an emergency.

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Exploring the Mighty Hills in India

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India is a land with great tourism potential. It’s a land with dazzling beaches, dramatic temples, exotic rain forests, colossal mountains, eternal deserts, lively cities, and the Indian peninsula creates an ultimate allure for the travelers across the globe. Vivid and diverse in culture, heritage and language, India is bestowed with rich natural beauty that adds to its tranquility.

Trippy Tricky Travel gives you a list of pristine places to explore and enjoy.

 

  1. KHAJJIAR.

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 Khajjiar, often called as India’s Switzerland

Khajjiar is a tiny hill station situated in Chamba district in the northwestern part of the state of Himachal Pradesh. Perched at an altitude of 1951 m above sea level and 23 km from Dalhousie towards Chamba, it is a grassy marg or meadow with a circumference of about 5 kms surrounded by thick deodar forest and has a lake in the centre. Lakhs of tourists not only from within the country but also from abroad visit this Khajjiar every year.

 

2. MALANA 

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Malana is also called as the “Little Greece in Himachal Pradesh”

Malana is a tiny unique village with about 100 houses and is situated to the north-east of Kullu Valley in Himachal Pradesh. It is believed that one of the finest Charas or ” Malana Cream” is grown in this region. It is believed that Malana Cream is the most strongest and top-notch Charas till date.

This ancient solitary village in Malana is isolated from the rest of the world. The majestic peaks of Chandrakhani shadow the village and it is among the must visit offbeat places in India. They are considered to be one of the first democracies in the world and do not follow the Constitution of India. They follow an indigenous system and they believe they are independent and superior. Malana is also called as the “Little Greece in Himachal Pradesh” as the Malanis believe that they are the descendents of Alexander-The Great!2

 

3. NUBRA VALLEY, LADAKH

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Known as MOONLAND

Sometimes known as ‘Moonland’, Ladakh is bounded by mountains and comprised of mountains. Human habitation is sparse, and during the wild winter months, the region is only marginally easier to reach than the moon itself. The imposing, inhospitable Nubra Valley is its wild lunar heart. Snuggled between the Karakoram Range and nourished by two rivers, Nubra is a lush green valley brimming with Sea buckthorns and Alfalfa.During summers, the whole place is carpeted with Pink and yellow roses and in autumns by oodles of wild lavenders which a sight beyond simple natural beauty. Nubra Valley should ideally be visited in the summer months of June to September.2

 

4. CHADAR TREK/ ZANSKAR VALLEY

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Known as FROZEN RIVER TREK

Walking on the frozen river of Zanskar is an amazing experience for an adventure lover. Experiencing the thrilling walk on Chadar Trek in the windswept moorland of the Buddhist kingdom of Ladakh, where sub-zero temperatures fit. The frozen sheet is the only way out for Zanskaris during winter when all other ways are filled with heaps of snow.

 

5. AULI

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This alluring little place in the lands of god- Uttarakhand, is one of the best places in India for Skiing. Located in the Chamoli district of Garhwal region, it also hosted the First SAF winter games in 2011 and is frequented by foreign tourists for winter sports. Situated at an elevation of around 2500 meters above sea level, the topography is considered perfect for professional as well beginners in Skiing. Also, Auli proudly flaunts Asias longest gondola where you can admire the stunning Himalaya, the deodar and pine forests adorning the panorama.2

 

6. SPITI

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Spiti is a delight for travellers. A virgin hill resort with opportunities for adventure sports, it fills visitors with awe at its majestic grandeur. Spiti is a relatively offbeat haven for trekkers and soul seekers, being home to many Buddhist temples and monasteries.

May to October is the best time to visit Spiti. The region receives light to medium rainfall at the time and the rain gives it the blush of a maiden fair, which makes this the best time to visit Spiti. The winters are harsh and many-a-time unbearable and should be avoided.

 

7. ROOPKUND LAKE

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Roopkund (locally known as Mystery and Skeletons Lake) is a high altitude glacial lake in the Uttrakhand state of India. It lies in the lap of Trishul massif and is famous for the hundreds of human skeletons found at the edge of the lake. The area is uninhabited, in the Himalayas at an altitude of 5,029 metres(16,499 feet).Surrounded by rock-strewn glaciers and snow-clad mountains, the lake is a popular trekking destination.

Ways to stay Motivated to Travel

 

Stay Motivated-Travel All the way

 

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Hold yourself accountable-

The best thing you can do to stay focused is to be held accountable. Being accountable to others will help make sure that you don’t fall off the wagon. They will help keep you focused on your goal, and the social pressure to stay on track will provide some extra motivation to follow through. Whether that is betting money, having someone check in on you, keeping track of goals, or having someone help you plan, just being held accountable will force you to stay focused, even on those days you don’t feel like it!

Research places to go-

Keep reading about places you want to visit and eventually you’ll get there. It may sound trite, but by always keeping travel on my mind, I always am excited about my future trips. I’m constantly researching destinations online, reading news from overseas, and generally getting to know the world better. The more I learn about different places, the more I think, “There are so many places to see, and no time to waste! Let’s go book a flight!”

Thinking about doing something all the time will make it happen.

Devote time-

Stuff always seems to come up, doesn’t it? Sure, I was planning to visit Nepal in May and then suddenly, May was here and I was busy. Or maybe you decide today’s the day you’re going to plan your trip but then you forget you have Work to do. My solution? Pick a day and time you are normally not busy (i.e., on Facebook) and devote that time to planning your trip. Make it a consistent part of your schedule and develop a habit so that it doesn’t feel like a task you “have” to do; it becomes just something you do automatically.

Read travel blogs-

Reading about other travelers’ adventures can show you that it is easier to travel than you thought, provide advice and tips on the art of travel, and teach you about places you’ve never heard of. One day you’ll get sick of living vicariously through others, and you’ll go out and create your own travel stories.

Read books-

While reading travel blogs is great, travel books are even better because they cut deep into a destination and open it up in a way a short travel story can’t. Every third book I read is about travel, and when I finish each one, I’m ready to go and explore the world.

Learn a language-

Join a class and pick up a language you might use on the road. Once you’ve started learning the language, you’ll hate to waste your new skill. And the only way to use it is to travel to where they speak it!

Take a break-

If you’ve been on the road for a while, you’ve probably burnt out a bit. Travel isn’t always rainbows and unicorns, and spending a lot of time on the road can lead to burnout. That’s going to sap your motivation and might even have you thinking about home. It did for me once (I got burnt out on my first trip and went home early), and the second I got home I face-smacked myself and said, “What was I thinking!” I learned my lesson and found that a much better way to get your mojo back is to take a break. Instead of moving on to your next destination, stay where you are for as long as you need. Watch TV, volunteer, work at your hostel, start a blog, or sit by the beach everyday — whatever relaxes you.